Bellmans to Offer Furniture and Works of Art from the Spencer House Stores

28 November 2022
Lot 1189 | A set of eight Louis XVI style gilt framed dining chairs. Estimate £200 - £300 (plus BP)*

Bellmans is announcing the auction of furniture and works of art from the Spencer House stores in a Sussex auction in January. The objects included are mainly a mixture of items once used or on display in the State Rooms and those used in the offices and meeting rooms after the extensive renovation of one of the last London private palaces, restored to its former glory by Lord Rothschild after agreeing the lease in 1985. Some of the items were sourced and acquired through David Mlinaric's company, Mlinaric, Henry & Zerduvachi Limited, who was in charge of the record breaking project.

Harrison Goldman, Bellmans' Auctioneer & Head of Sale comments: ‘It is a great honour to be entrusted to sell a selection of items from the store rooms of Spencer House. As one of the last private palaces in Central London, this sale is a unique opportunity to acquire furniture, lighting and decorative objects that were supplied by leading interior decorators of the day such as David Mlinaric and Christopher Gibbs for Lord Rothschild, who took on the lease in 1985 when the house was completely bare and in a poor state of condition. The objects offered here for sale were supplied as part one of the largest private restoration projects of the period, now they are ready to find new homes at auction with Bellmans.’

When the Economist Intelligence Unit left the building in 1984, the search for a new tenant started and Lord Rothschild happened to have offices opposite and decided to look into how he could use the impressive town house for offices, while also rescuing the house from its long decline and restoring it in line with its architectural importance. The project also had to be commercially viable and Lord Rothschild and his team explored several options before deciding on occupying the building as the headquarters of RIT Capital Partners and using the restored State Rooms as a venue for private event hire and public tours to rival the events during its Georgian heyday.

Left: Bellmans' Auctioneer & Head of Sale, Harrison Goldman with various Works of Art Lots and Lot 1190, a mahogany eight drawer pedestal desk, estimate £100 - £150 (plus BP). Right: One of a set of eight 20th century George III style mahogany dining chairs. Estimate £200 - £300 (plus BP)*.

He successfully negotiated a lease with the Spencer trustees in 1985 and the restoration of the interior was entrusted to David Mlinaric, who was involved from the outset and advised on the project throughout. Before work began, Joseph Friedman (later author of Spencer House: Chronicle of a London Mansion (Zwemmer, 1993) was commissioned to undertake a historic survey of the house which would inform the restoration. In addition, a microscopic analysis was made of the paintwork in the State Rooms to determine the prior use of colour and gilding. This was done by Tom Helme, an expert on historic paints.

While for some rooms there was enough evidence found to attempt a close approximation to the original decorative scheme, in other rooms David had to use his instinct and knowledge of the period to produce convincing interpretations of how the interiors may have looked. A panel of advisers was also appointed with expertise of this particular Georgian period. Thus began one of the largest restoration projects ever attempted in England outside the public domain.

Left: Lot 608 | A Chinoiserie decorated Decalcomania baluster table lamp. Estimate: £80 - £120 (plus BP)*. Middle: Lot 611 | A Louis XVI style gilt-bronze three light wall applique. Estimate £80 - £120 (plus BP).* Right: Lot 613 | A black cast-iron sarcophagus shaped coal bucket. Estimate £100 - £150 (plus BP).*

When it came to furnishing the rooms with objects, David Mlinaric worked with John Harris and Christopher Gibbs (a London dealer with special knowledge of the 18th century) to scour show rooms for suitable antique furniture. However, even their generous budget couldn’t stretch as far as it needed so they also secured loans of furniture and artworks from public and private collections, including from the V&A, and the Leeds Museums and Galleries to name a few. The rest of the house was sensitively converted into offices and is still the headquarters of RIT Capital Partners plc. David Mlinaric also oversaw the decoration and furnishing of these spaces.

Left: Lot 607 | Two similar gilt-metal mounted Wedgewood Jasper porcelain corinthian column table lamps. Estimate £500 - £800 (plus BP)*. Middle: A George III pine door with six fielded panels with two additional doors. Estimate £200 - £300 (plus BP)*. Right: Lot 1196 | Donal Channer and Co after a design by John Yenn; a pair of faux marble painted console tables. Estimate £300 - £500 (plus BP)*.

Among the highlights of the auction are a pair of George III wooden benches, various original Regency chairs and perfect replicas, as well as several lamps which have been converted from gas to electricity.

Left: Lot 1197 | A set of ten gilt framed lattice back ballroom chairs. Estimate £150 - £250 (plus BP)*. Right: A Charles X circular marble topped gueridon centre table. Estimate £300 - £500 (plus BP)*.

Spencer House is one of the last great family houses remaining in London, only Aspley House and the Wallace Collection (solely a museum now) are also still intact. The Blitz, lack of planning controls and crippling taxes, mean that tragically most of the grand townhouses have disappeared. They were often showier than their country cousins as London was more competitive, so they were more daring in their architecture and decoration. Spencer House is a fine example of the neoclassical movement.

In 1927 the house was leased to the Ladies' Army & Navy Club, removing all its contents to Althorp. In 1942, worried about air raids, Earl Spencer removed many original interior features, including chimneypieces and doorcases, to Althorp for safekeeping. And rightly so, in 1944 a bomb fell on neighbouring Bridgewater House causing serious damage to Spencer House, particularly in the Painted Room. After the war it was used as an office building with its grand State Rooms pressed into use as typists' pools and executives' offices, adorned with lifts and fire doors, neon lights and lino floors.

Top Left: Lot 606 | A pair of William IV Rococo Revival ormolu candlestick table lamps, circa 1830 (detail). Estimate £500 - £800 (plus BP)*. Right: Lot 1194 | A set of four mid 18th century design studded rouge leather upholstered mahogany framed hump back dining chairs. Estimate £100 - £200 (plus BP).* Bottom Left: Lot 1200 | In the manner of Charles Heathcote Tatham; a pair of cream painted rectangular benches (detail). Estimate £1,000 - £2,500 (plus BP)*.

Spencer House was one of the most ambitious and finest aristocratic palaces ever erected in London. John, 1st Earl Spencer asked John Vardy and James 'Athenian' Stuart to build it between 1756 and 1766. John had inherited a fortune from his grandfather, the 3rd Earl of Sutherland and his great-grandmother Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, while still a minor. He had a rare love match and married 18-year-old Georgiana Poyntz, one of the great beauties of her generation, only 24 hours after he became of age in December 1755. They were fêted by London society and within a year of their marriage they began building the house overlooking Green Park. The house was conceived as a temple dedicated to Bacchus, the embodiment of hospitality and the 1st Earl preferred the classical style to the Chinese or Japanese popular in interior decoration at the time. The house remained structurally unchanged for years, but the 2nd Earl, a bibliophile, converted the Palm Room into a library.

Victoria Wilson, Spencer House's Collections Manager says: "Anyone valuing Georgian architecture will appreciate the magnificent restoration. It was very much decided not to take any shortcuts and although the objects included in this sale are not original to the house, they form a part of its incredible recent history of survival and revival against the odds."

©Jarrold Publishing/Spencer House

Spencer House is open to the public for viewing every Sunday (except during August) from 10.00 am – 4.30 pm (last tour). Access is by guided tour, which lasts approximately 1 hour. Tours begin at regular intervals and the maximum number of visitors on each tour is 20. £18.50 per person, concessions available.

The selection from the Spencer House Stores will be offered at auction in West Sussex and online at bellmans.co.uk on Wednesday, 18th January within Bellmans' Works of Art and Furniture auctions.

Viewing in West Sussex is available:

Friday, 13 January | 10am - 4pm
Saturday, 14 January | 9am -12:30pm

For further information please contact Harrison Goldman, Bellmans' Auctioneer & Head of Sale, on 020 4548 4738 or email [email protected]

*Please be advised this lot is subject to 20% VAT on the Hammer.

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