• SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image
  • SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image
  • SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image
  • SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image
  • SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image
  • SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010).  The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]... Image

Lot 760

SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010). The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July]...

SALINGER, J. D. (1919-2010). The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [July] 1951. 8vo (197 x 135mm). Half title, title within single-rule border with typographical headpiece and printer's device (a few leaves lightly spotted and browned, elsewhere some extremely faint spotting). Original black buckram, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, dust-jacket by Michael Mitchell, price of $3.00 unclipped, monochrome photographed portrait of the author on the lower wrapper by Lotte Jacobi (some minor chipping at head head and foot of backstrip, another small chip to upper edge of upper wrapper, some rubbing to corners of lower wrapper affecting 2 letters, some extremely faint spotting and staining). A FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, the dust-jacket with the price of $3.00 directly above the 'shoulder' of the letter 'R' on the front turn-in, and the portrait on the lower wrapper cropped at the top. Anthony Burgess Ninety-Nine Novels pp.53-54; Bixby A2; Starosciak A30. "This novel is a key-work of the nineteen-fifties in that the theme of youthful rebellion is first adumbrated in it, though the hero, Holden Caulfield, is more a gentle voice of protest, unprevailing in the noise, than a militant world-changer ... The Catcher in the Rye was a symptom of a need, after a ghastly war and during a ghastly pseudo-peace, for the young to raise a voice of protest against the failure of the adult world. The young used many voices - anger, contempt, self-pity - but the quietest, that of a decent perplexed American adolescent, proved the most telling" (Anthony Burgess).